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20140101
20140131
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KPIX (CBS) 21
WUSA (CBS) 6
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English 27
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
attacks. dr. jon lapook has the details. and securing the super bowl. bob orr asks the men in charge how they'll protect america's biggest game. >> reporter: what's the latest intelligence tell you about potential threats? captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. the gridlock is breaking tonight after something that is not supposed to happen did. in an area called the sun belt in a city known as hotlanta, ice caused a meltdown. the winter storm that brought snow and ice to the south yesterday stranded thousands bumper to bump hour after hour an roadslippery cars and tr get traction. some people spent the night in supermarkets and kids slept overnight on the floors of their schools. more than 1,200 traffic accidents were reported in georgia alone. mark strassmann is in atlanta for us tonight. mark? >> reporter: scott, i'm standing along i 285 south of atlanta. this traffic has just started inching forward but mostly it's been at a stand still. remember, some of these drivers are still trying to finish last night's commute. >> o
patients. dr. jon lapook on the new research. and what's the downside to living in the white house? you can't lie about your age. chip reid with the first lady's significant birthday. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening, this is our western edition and we begin the broadcast in the west where that fast-moving brushfire is still burning out of control, threatening homes east of los angeles. hundreds of firefighters are trying to contain it. strong winds early in the day made that difficult. hundreds of people who live in glen dora and azusa have been ordered to evacuate. we were sent this picture of the fire bearing down on her neighbor's home. the police believe the fire was started by campers in the angeles national forest. carter evans is on the screen for us, carter? >> firefighters are still putting out some hot spots, scott. this is one of five homes that were destroyed. 17 more were burned and 2,000 people were forced to evacuate. this fire has been burning all day and it's now only 30% contained. >> the fire began just
, liver, and colon cancer. dr. jon lapook questions the surgeon general on today's new report. >> well, right now, of every three cancers in the united states one of those cancers is caused by cigarette smoking. >> pelley: we've learned what the president will do about secret surveillance of american phone calls. major garrett reports. california firefighters press their attack as the governor declares an emergency. carter evans is there. and steve hartman "on the road" with mia schand who never believed what they said about her husband. >> i never gave up. never. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: and good evening. this is our western edition. more than 3,200 american children did something today that could lead to an early death: they smoked their first cigarette. that's one of the findings in a new 980-page wakeup call from the surgeon general about newly discovered dangers of smoking. 50 years after the first alarm went out that smoking causes lung cancer today's report says it causes as many as 10 other life-shortening diseases
testosterone, so we asked dr. jon lapook to tell us more. u.c.l.a. of insurance claims for more than 55,000 men looked at the rate of heart attacks within 90 days of starting testosterone. in men 65 and older, the risk more than doubled. many men younger than 65 with a history of heart disease the risk almost tripled. testosterone treatment is only f.d.a. approved for conditions linked with so-called low "t." documented low testosterone levels. but many men without low "t" are being treated for a variety of symptoms such as fatigue and diminished libido. a study earlier this month found 43% of men receiving the hormone 4ú#ad a normal level. cardiologist dr. steve nissen of the cleveland clinic. >> we don't know very much about this therapy. what's going on is a giant experiment with american men's health at stake because we don't have the long-term data on the safety of these products. >> reporter: annual prescriptions for testosterone more than doubled in just four years to 430 million thanks in part to advertisements like this. >> i have low testosterone. there i said it. >> once it appears
.ops liz palmer reports. can a blood test spot an athlete's concussion? dr. jon lapook on new research. and chip reid takes a break from the cold with an artist who freezes time. >> you're out there trying to capture mother nature's art. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. this is our western edition. it is dangerously cold in much of the country. many places it's the coldest that it's been in decades. tonight in chicago it will feel as if it's 50 below zero. it was so cold there today the de-icing liquid used at o'hare airport froze. and chicago is just the tip of the iceberg that is middle america. in indianapolis, where miguel silva was shoveling snow, the windchill is in the minus 30s tonight. for many this will be a night in the cold and the dark. 50,000 power outages are reported in the region. most of them in indiana. in owen, wisconsin, the temperature today, the actual temperature, hit 29 below zero. and as far south as waco, texas, the temperature got as low as 16 degrees, breaking a record that had stood for
investigation on sexual harassment. what's the problem at the military academies? dr. jon lapook reports on why big food companies have cut calories in packaged foods. and why is a predator of the arctic flying to florida and kansas? jim axelrod on a mystery migration. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening, this is our western edition. today the nation saw a side of republican chris christie we hadn't seen before. the usually brash, blunt, in your face governor of new jersey was humble and contrite as he tried to rescue his career and any presidential hopes from a scandal. he said he had nothing to do with the political dirty trick aimed at the democratic mayor of fort lee, new jersey, though he took responsibility for it and apologized. a top aide had engineered a massive traffic jam in fort lee as revenge against the mayor. today christie called that member of his inner circle "stupid and deceitful." he said she lied to him about it and he fired her today asked if the traffic jam ploy reflected his style as governor christie said
reports. a virus that strikes young children makes a big comeback. dr. jon lapook on where and why. and what's causing california's historic drought? ben tracy says meteorologists may have found the answer-- and it doesn't look good. >> it breaks your heart. it's really sad. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. á>>[3gp?rlkñ pelley:Ñ'i league baseball and one of its biggest stars moved to a new arena-- a federal court in new york. alex rodriguez, third baseman for the new york yankees, filed suit asking the court to throw out his season-long suspension for using banned substances. an arbitrator upheld that suspension over the weekend. rodriguez denies doping, but last night on "60 minutes," his chief accuser told a very different story. anthony bosch said rodriguez paid him $12,000 a month to administer a program of banned drugs. jim axelrod begins our coverage. >> reporter: lawyers for alex rodriguez argue fred horowitz, baseball's chief arbitrator who heard the case, was biased, ruling in favor of baseball to keep his job. joe tacopina i
, this broadcast has been to a lot of places, but never to where dr. jon lapook is taking us tonight. we're going inside the trial and approval process for an experimental treatment for m.s.. >> reporter: 11 years ago, megan quinn had just got married and was the picture of health. >> i used to run five miles a day. all of a sudden on my third mile i started dragging my foot. i didn't understand, i thought okay, i'm getting old and tired. i was 27 years old. but nothing ever occurred to me something was wrong. >> reporter: the diagnosis was multiple sclerosis. the multiple sclerosis-- or m.s. is an autoimmune disease where the body attacks itself and damages myelin, the protective covering surrounding nerve cells. with that insulation compromises the nerves deteriorate and can cause a wide range of symptoms including visual problems, fatigue and weakness. >> for the past year i've had it -- a really bad time with this disease. >> reporter: in what way? >> my hip not working. one night i woke up and i couldn't feel either of my legs. right now my biggest problem is my hamstring. i cannot get my ha
palmer reports. can a blood test spot an athlete's concussion? dr. jon lapook on new research. and chip reid takes a break from the cold with an artist who freezes time. >> you're out there trying to capture mother nature's art. captioning sponsored by cbs
cancer. dr. jon lapook questions the surgeon general on today's new report. >> well, right now, of every three cancers in the united states one of those cancers is caused by cigarette smoking. >> pelley: we've learned what the president will do about secret surveillance of american phone calls. major garrett reports. california firefighters press their attack as the governor declares an emergency. carter evans is there. and steve hartman "on the road" with mia schand who never believed what they said about her husband. >> i never gave up. never. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley.
the nation trim its waistline. as dr. jon lapook reports, they're even exceeding their own goals. >> reporter: researchers at the university of north carolina found the company sold 6.4 trill yn fewer calories in 2012 than in 2007. that's four times the amount they had pledged. the drop translates to an average of 78 fewer calories sold daily to each american. that's the equivalent to about a cookie a day or roughly eight pounds lost per year. it's not known whether people actually consumed 78 fewer calories per day. the company's pledge was in collaboration with first lady ooh michelle obama's "let's move" initiative. last year we spoke about the role. >> we need to keep pushing every step of the way. >> you've about done that pushing every step of the way but there's been a lot of pushback from the industry. >> one of the things we have to remind parents is we're the ones that set the demand. so if we're asking our food producers and our restaurant chains and the companies that sell us food and market to us, if we're changing that demand curve, they're going to follow us. >> the study said
concussions with the help of a college football team. dr. jon lapook has that story. >> reporter: quarterback taylor kelly of the arizona state sun devils understands the mind-set of the college football players when it comes to injuries. you really can't trust the judgment of a guy who is 18 to 22, right? >> exactly. >> reporter: they want to keep playing, right? >> exactly. they don't care. they're head's a little more banged up. >> reporter: neurologist dr. javier cardenas specializes in train injuries. is he head overreluctance of athletes to admit symptoms is only one of the problems. >> right now, when we identify a concussion it is purely subjective. we look at symptoms. do they have headaches? do they have dizziness? there is no objective information. having something objective is the holy grail of concussions. >> reporter: this season, kelly and his teammates took part in a study trying to find a better way to detect concussions. riddell the athletic equipment company supplies the team with helmets that measured all head impact during practices and games. and then after every game, t
. jon lapook reports on why big food companies have cut calories in packaged foods. and why is a
a big comeback. dr. jon lapook on where and why. and what's causing california's historic drought? ben tracy says meteorologists may have found the answer-- and it doesn't look good. >> it breaks your heart. it's really sad. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley.
to noise. dr. jon lapook takes a look. >> i would describe having asperger's syndrome as being like a computer that's running a different operating system than what most computers run. >> reporter: 16-year-old austin miller wasn't diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder until he was 12. but even when he was a toddler, his mother karen noticed he had extreme reactions to sound. >> i learned very early on with him that i had to speak slower and softer because it would upset him, and i would notice that he might not really understand what i'm saying. >> reporter: researchers have long known that kids with autism struggle with communication. for the first time, scientists at vanderbilt university have shown one reason why. a typical person sees me talking and it's in sync. but in many kids with autism, there's a delay between what they see and what they hear. so they experience speech like this-- out of sync. it's as if they're watching a badly dubbed movie where the words and the pictures don't match up. mark wallace is the lead author of the study. >> one of the classic pictures th
reversed progressive blindness in some patients. dr. jon lapook on the new research. and what's the downside to living in the white house? you can't lie about your age. chip reid with the first lady's significant birthday.
that afflicts as many as 350,000 americans, and there's no cure but this morning, dr. jon lapook looks at an experimental treatment. >> reporter: 11 years ago, megan quinn had just gotten married and was the picture of health. >> i used to run five miles a day. all of a sudden on my third mile, i started dragging my foot. i didn't understand. i thought, okay, i'm just getting old and i'm getting tired. i was 27 years old. but nothing ever clicked to me that something was wrong. >> reporter: the diagnosis was multiple sclerosis. multiple sclerosis or ms, is an autoimmune disease where the body attacks itself and damages myelin, the protective covering surrounding nerve cells. with that insulation compromised the nerves deteriorate and can cause a wide range of symptoms, including visual problems, fatigue and weakness. >> for the past year, i've had a really bad time with this disease. >> reporter: in what way? >> just with my hip not working with -- one night, i woke up and i couldn't feel either of my legs. right now, my biggest problem is my hamstring. i cannot get my hamstring to coo
the weather is doing next. a new study links testosterone supplements to heart attacks. dr. jon lapook has the details. and securing the super bowl. bob orr asks the men in charge how they'll protect america's biggest
to heart attacks. dr. jon lapook has the details. and securing the super bowl. bob orr asks the men in charge how they'll protect america's biggest game. >> reporter: what's the latest intelligence tell you about potential threats? captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley.
not be a great for your body. say it ain't so. dr. jon lapook and medical contributor holly phillips up next. this is "cbs this morning saturday." ♪ ♪ make every day her day with a full menu of appetizers and entrées crafted with care and designed to delight. fancy feast. love served daily. [ male announcer ] even ragu users a. chose prego homestyle alfredo over ragu classic alfredo. prego alfredo?! [ thinking ] why can't all new things be this great? ha ha! whoa! [ monkey squeals ] [ sighs ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. [ male announcer ] coughequence #5. the sleepless night. [ coughing ] [ crying ] sorry. [ male announcer ] new robitussin dm max nighttime. fast, powerful cough relief that helps you sleep like a baby. robitussin nighttime. don't suffer the coughequences. [ female announcer ] nature valley soft-baked oatmeal squares. hearty oatmeal, softly baked with a drizzle of cinnamon. it's a soft take on a morning classic. soft-baked oatmeal squares from nature valley. wow, this hotel is amazing. oh no. who are you? who are you? wrong answer.
everyone fears, alzheimer's. we have with us dr. jon lapook and dr. rudolph tanzi, director of the research and aging unit. >>> last month they held a summit on the growing threat of alzheimer's and other forms of dementia. british prime minister david camm ron promised to double his nation's commitment to research funding over the next decade to fight the global epidemic. >> a new case every second a global cost of $600 billion a year, and that is to say nothing of the human cost because it doesn't matter whether you're in london, los angeles, rural india or japan, this disease steals lives, it wrecks families it breaks hearts. and that is why all of us here are so utterly determined to beat it. >> i mean, jon, we're seeing similar amounts of growth here in the u.s. why now? what is different to this epidemic that's leading it to explode? >> it's huge. right now about 5 million americans have alzheimer's. that's expected to triple by 2050. right now we're spending about $200 billion in direct health care costs for people who have alzheimer's. that
correspondent dr. jon lapook and cbs contributor dr. holly phillips. >> first up this morning jon has fascinating inside into autism. >> anthony, a new study is shedding key light. why some children have extreme sensitivity to light and noise. >> i would describe it as a different computer operating system than most computers run. >> reporter: 16-year-old austin wasn't diagnosed with it until he was 12 but even add a toddler his mother karen noticed he had extreme reactions to sound. >> i learned early on with him that i had to speak slower and softer because it would upset him and i would notice that he might not really understand what i'm saying. >> researchers have long known that kids with autism struggle with communication. for the first time scientists at vanderbilt university have shown within reason why. a typical person sees me talk and it's in synch but in many kids with autism, there's a delay between what they see and what they hear so they experience speech like this, out of synch. it's as if they're watch bagdly dubbed movie where the words and th
skront dr. jon lapook and cbs contributor dr. holly phillips. >> today we're marking a major land mark. it was the surgeon general linching smoking to cancer. harry reasoner filing this report back in 1964. >> reporter: in the history of the world, nothing ever duo so entranced, so fast. 70 million americans smoke. today they got a message from the sur yen general who's got a blue ribbonto mortality from certain specific diseases and to the overall death rate. >> jon, that report was a real blockbuster, of. give us the impact. >> i remember so well when they came out. i was in the sixth grade. everyone was smoking. edward r. murrow smoking on television and famous people who everybody admired like audrey hepburn and who can forget in "breakfast at tiffany's" with the long cigarette holder. >> it was glam orrized. >> yeah it was glam or rised. 42% smoked. it dropped to 18%. still, 44 million americans smoke and more than a dozen cancers are caused by it. >> i want to ask you. that 1964 report set off a lot of public policy and health decisions. how did it make it h
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)